Land use and climate change adaptation strategies in Kenya

Abstract

Climate variability and change mitigation and adaptation policies need to prioritize land users needs at local level because it is at this level that impact is felt most. In order to address the challenge of socio-economic and unique regional geographical setting, a customized methodological framework was developed for application in assessment of climate change vulnerability perception and adaptation options around the East African region. Indicators of climate change and variability most appropriate for the region were derived from focused discussions involving key informants in various sectors of the economy drawn from three East African countries. Using these indicators, a structured questionnaire was developed from which surveys and interviews were done on selected sample of target population of farming communities in the Mt. Kenya region. The key highlights of the questionnaire were vulnerability and adaptation. Data obtained from respondents was standardized and subjected to multivariate and ANOVA analysis. Based on principle component analysis (PCA), two main vulnerability categories were identified namely the social and the bio-physical vulnerability indicators. Analysis of variance using Kruskal-Wallis test showed significant statistical variation (P ≤ 0.05) in the perceived vulnerability across the spatial distribution of the 198 respondents. Three insights were distinguished and were discernible by agro-ecological zones. Different vulnerability profiles and adaptive capacity profiles were generated demonstrating the need for prioritizing adaptation and mitigation efforts at local level. There was a high correlation between the bio-physical and social factor/livelihood variables that were assessed.

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Correspondence to Aggrey Ochieng Adimo.

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Adimo, A.O., Njoroge, J.B., Claessens, L. et al. Land use and climate change adaptation strategies in Kenya. Mitig Adapt Strateg Glob Change 17, 153–171 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11027-011-9318-6

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Keywords

  • Adaptation planning
  • Biophysical indicators
  • Climate vulnerability perception
  • Social acceptability
  • Social indicators
  • Vulnerability profile.