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Greenhouse gas mitigation in developing countries through technology transfer?: a survey of empirical evidence

  • Sonja PetersonEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

While greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are projected to rise primarily in the developing countries, the potential for developing new GHG mitigation technologies exists primarily in the industrialized countries. It is thus important, not only for predictions about future emission paths but also for climate change mitigation policies, to understand how the international diffusion of such technologies takes place and how it affects the energy infrastructure and GHG emissions in developing countries. This paper provides an overview of the channels through which these technologies diffuse and focuses on the empirical evidence pertaining to the effects these technologies have on GHG emissions in developing countries.

Keywords

Climate change Developing countries FDI Trade Technology diffusion Technology transfer 

JEL Classifications

O33 O13 F18 F21 F35 Q54 

Notes

Acknowlegments

I thank Andreas Keller, Gernot Klepper and five anonymous referees for helpful comments and suggestions and Paul Kramer for greatly streamlining the language and structure of the paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW)KielGermany

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