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What powers logical inference?

John D. Norton: The material theory of induction. Calgary: BSPS Open/ University of Calgary Press, 2021, 680 pp, $59.99 PB, e-book open access BSPS Open/University of Calgary Press

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References

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Acknowledgements

I am grateful to Michael Tamir, Thomas Lockhart, and especially David de Bruijn for many invaluable discussions and comments on earlier versions of this essay.

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Correspondence to Elay Shech.

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Shech, E. What powers logical inference?. Metascience (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11016-022-00783-z

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