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Metascience

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 37–46 | Cite as

On the Couch with Freud and Kuhn

Dagmar Herzog: Cold War Freud: psychoanalysis in an age of catastrophes. Cambridge University Press, 2016, 320pp, £24.99 HB
  • George Reisch
Review Essay
  • 142 Downloads

Long ago, I planned to become a psychiatrist. My mother, however, was not happy about this. “Oh, no,” she would say. “They have the highest suicide rate!” So I went into philosophy and history of science. Because of this road-not-taken, I cannot speak as an expert about the many psychiatrists and psychoanalytic texts that Dagmar Herzog treats in this volume. Still, I am attracted to the issues and I admire Herzog’s defense of Freud. Psychiatry is now dominated by other kinds of therapy, and Freud himself has been attacked since the 1980s as a charlatan who founded a secret society, confused research with personal vendettas and rivalries, and ignored the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse (see, for example, Crews et al. 1997; Crews 2017). Everyone loves to hate Freud, it seems, but not Herzog.

Herzog is a historian, so do not look for technical philosophical rejoinders to critics of psychoanalysis like Karl Popper or Adolf Grünbaum. Instead, Herzog narrows her focus to those analysts,...

Notes

Acknowledgement

I thank K. Brad Wray for strategically editing this essay.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ChicagoUSA

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