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Metascience

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 447–450 | Cite as

Complexity and its context in science and religion

Gary Ferngren (ed.): Science and religion: a historical introduction, 2nd ed. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017, xiv+484pp, $32.95 PB
  • Adam RichterEmail author
Book Review

The second edition of Gary Ferngren’s edited volume, Science and religion: a historical introduction, addresses a real need in the historiography and pedagogy of science and religion. More approachable than the likes of Science and religion: new historical perspectives (Dixon et al. 2010) but more advanced than a collection like Galileo goes to jail (Numbers 2009)—each of which is commendable in its own right, but addresses a different audience—this volume offers a foothold for readers who have a familiarity with, but not an expertise in, the history of science and religion.

Collectively, the thirty concise and well-written chapters in the volume present a clear picture of how historians approach science and religion within the framework of the “complexity thesis”. This view, prominent since the early 1990s, holds that the interactions between various kinds of natural and divine knowledge have been so complex and so dynamic throughout history that no overarching master...

References

  1. Dixon, Thomas, Geoffrey Cantor, and Stephen Pumfrey, eds. 2010. Science and religion: New historical perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Ferngren, Gary, ed. 2002. Science and religion: A historical introduction, 1st ed. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Harrison, Peter. 2015. The territories of science and religion. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Numbers, Ronald, ed. 2009. Galileo goes to jail and other myths about science and religion. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Numbers, Ronald. 2010. Simplifying complexity. In Science and religion: New historical perspectives, ed. Thomas Dixon, Geoffrey Cantor, and Stephen Pumfrey, 263–282. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Park, Katharine, and Lorraine Daston, eds. 2006. The Cambridge history of science, vol. 3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and TechnologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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