The middle ages and modern science

James Hannam: God’s philosophers: How the medieval world laid the foundations of modern science. London: Icon Books, 2009, xi+435 pp, £17.99 HB

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The quotations from Albert and Thomas are taken from Grant (2007: 252–253).

  2. 2.

    See Nicole Oresme and the Kinematics of Circular Motion: Tractatus de commensurabilitate vel incommensurabilitate motuum celi, edited with an Introduction, English Translation, and Commentary by Edward Grant (Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1971), 321. The words “for as demonstrated elsewhere” refer to Oresme’s On Ratios of Ratios (Tractatus de proportionibus proportionum), Chapter Three, Proposition X in Nicole Oresme, De proportionibus proportionum and Ad pauca respicientes, edited with Introductions, English Translations, and Critical Notes by Edward Grant (Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1966), 247–255.

  3. 3.

    See Nicole Oresme “De proportionibus proportionum”, 142–143.

References

  1. de Ridder-Symoens, H. 1992. A history of the University in Europe, Vol. 1: Universities in the middle ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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  2. Grant, Edward. 1996. The foundations of modern science in the middle ages: Their religious, institutional, and intellectual contexts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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  3. Grant, Edward. 2007. A history of natural philosophy: From the ancient world to the nineteenth century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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Grant, E. The middle ages and modern science. Metascience 20, 185–190 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11016-010-9438-8

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