Metabolic Brain Disease

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 981–986 | Cite as

Cardiovascular profile improvement during Natalizumab treatment

  • Marcello Moccia
  • Roberto Albero
  • Roberta Lanzillo
  • Francesco Saccà
  • Anna De Rosa
  • Cinzia Valeria Russo
  • Antonio Carotenuto
  • Raffaele Palladino
  • Vincenzo Brescia Morra
Short Communication

Abstract

Cardiovascular comorbidities are associated with the risk of MS progression. Thus, we aim to measure variations of cardiovascular risk factors during Natalizumab treatment and their possible clinical associations. Seventy-one relapsing-remitting MS patients treated with Natalizumab were followed-up during a 12.9 ± 6.2 months. Cardiovascular risk factors were recorded on first and last study visits: systolic blood pressure, uric acid, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides. EDSS progression and relapse occurrence were recorded. At multilevel mixed-effects linear regression models, the population presented with a significant reduction of total cholesterol (Coeff = −7.340; 95%CI = −13.152--1.527; p = 0.013), and of HDL cholesterol (Coeff = −3.473; 95%CI = −6.333--0.613; p = 0.017), and a non-significant reduction of LDL cholesterol (Coeff = −1.872; 95%CI = −8.481–0.736; p = 0.053), and of triglycerides (Coeff = −8.815; 95%CI = −34.011–5.380; p = 0.094). Uric acid levels increased during the study period (Coeff = 0.159; 95%CI = 0.212–0.340; p = 0.038). No significant associations were found with clinical outcomes. Serum lipids decreased and anti-oxidant uric acid increased during Natalizumab treatment. These biomarkers need to be further explored in relation to clinical outcomes on larger cohorts with longer follow-ups.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis Cardiovascular Cholesterol Uric Natalizumab 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Research funding played no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the report for publication.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

In compliance with current Italian applicable laws and regulations, considering that all data was publicly available and that the analyses included anonymized data, specific ethics approval was not required. The study was performed in accordance with Declaration of Helsinki.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcello Moccia
    • 1
  • Roberto Albero
    • 1
  • Roberta Lanzillo
    • 1
  • Francesco Saccà
    • 1
  • Anna De Rosa
    • 1
  • Cinzia Valeria Russo
    • 1
  • Antonio Carotenuto
    • 1
  • Raffaele Palladino
    • 2
    • 3
  • Vincenzo Brescia Morra
    • 1
  1. 1.Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Centre, Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive Science and OdontostomatologyFederico II UniversityNaplesItaly
  2. 2.Department of Primary Care and Public HealthImperial CollegeLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Public HealthFederico II UniversityNaplesItaly

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