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Chlorogenic acid regulates apoptosis and stem cell marker-related gene expression in A549 human lung cancer cells

Abstract

Previous studies indicated that chlorogenic acid, a compound present in many fruits and vegetables, has anti-cancer activities. We report that chlorogenic acid regulates the expression of apoptosis-related genes and self-renewal-related stem cell markers in cancer cells. The lung cancer cell line A549 was cultured with or without chlorogenic acid. The presence of chlorogenic acid decreased cell proliferation as measured by MTT activity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that treatment of cells with chlorogenic acid reduced the expression of BCL2 but increased that of both BAX and CASP3. Chlorogenic acid enhanced annexin V expression as measured using fluorescently labeled annexin V. Chlorogenic acid also induced p38 MAPK and JNK gene expression. Meanwhile, several agents, including SB203580 (p38 MAP kinase inhibitor), N-acetylcysteine (antioxidant inhibitor), dipyridamole (phosphodiesterase inhibitor), and apocynin (NADPH-oxidase inhibitor) blocked chlorogenic acid-induced BAX gene expression. Chlorogenic acid reduced gene expression levels of stem cell-associated markers NANOG, POU5F1, and SOX2. Together these results indicate that chlorogenic acid affects the expression of apoptosis-related genes that are part of oxidative stress and p38 MAP-dependent pathways, as well as genes encoding stem cell markers. In conclusion, chlorogenic acid may contribute to the polyphenolic anti-cancer effect associated with consumption of vegetables and fruits.

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Abbreviations

CSCs:

Cancer stem cells

NAC:

N-acetylcysteine

NSCLC:

Non-small cell lung cancer

ROS:

Reactive oxygen species (ROS)

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Correspondence to Kazuo Yamagata.

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Yamagata, K., Izawa, Y., Onodera, D. et al. Chlorogenic acid regulates apoptosis and stem cell marker-related gene expression in A549 human lung cancer cells. Mol Cell Biochem 441, 9–19 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11010-017-3171-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11010-017-3171-1

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Chlorogenic acid
  • Stem cell markers