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Antioxidant activities of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) during hypoxia induced oxidative stress in glial cells

Abstract

The present study reports the cytoprotective and antioxidant properties of alcoholic leaf extract of seabuckthorn (SBT) against hypoxia induced oxidative stress in C-6 glioma cells. Exposure of cells to hypoxia for 12 h resulted in a significant increase in cytotoxicity and decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential compared to the controls. Further an appreciable increase in nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was noted which in turn was responsible for fall in intracellular antioxidant levels and GSH/GSSG ratio. There was a significant increase in DNA damage during hypoxia as revealed by comet assay. Pretreatment of cells with alcoholic leaf extract of SBT at 200 μg/ml significantly inhibited cytotoxicity, ROS production and maintained antioxidant levels similar to that of control cells. Further, the leaf extract restored the mitochondrial integrity and prevented the DNA damage induced by hypoxia. These results indicate that the leaf extract of SBT has strong antioxidant and cytoprotective activity against hypoxia induced oxidative injury. (Mol Cell Biochem 278: 9–14, 2005)

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Correspondence to M. Sai Ram.

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Narayanan, S., Ruma, D., Gitika, B. et al. Antioxidant activities of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) during hypoxia induced oxidative stress in glial cells. Mol Cell Biochem 278, 9–14 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11010-005-7636-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11010-005-7636-2

Key Word

  • Seabuckthorn
  • leaf extract
  • hypoxia
  • ROS
  • DNA damage
  • antioxidant activity