Continental Philosophy Review

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 381–402 | Cite as

The phenomenon and the transcendental: Jean-Luc Marion, Marc Richir, and the issue of phenomenalization

Article

Abstract

After reviewing the status of the concept of the phenomenon in Husserl’s phenomenology and the aim of successive attempts to reform, de-formalize, and to widen it, we show the difficulties of a method that, following the example of Jean-Luc Marion’s phenomenology, intends to connect the phenomenon directly to the revelation of an exteriority. We argue that, on the contrary, Marc Richir’s phenomenology, which strives to grasp the phenomenon as nothing-but-phenomenon, is more likely to capture the “meaning” of the phenomenological, and hence to help us orient in the field of problems that phenomenology encounters without always knowing how to tackle them. Yet, this extension of the phenomenon’s domain does not thereby encompass everything: there may well be certain issues that require a phenomenology without phenomenon; but the meaning of this cannot be determined before the complete reenvisioning of transcendental phenomenology.

Keywords

Phenomenology Transcendental Meaning Marion Husserl Richir 

References

  1. Derrida, J. 1978. Violence and metaphysics. Writing and difference (trans and annotated: Alan, Bass). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  2. English, J. 2005. Sur l’intentionnalité et ses modes. Paris: PUF.Google Scholar
  3. Forestier, F. 2007. Phénoménologie et singularité. Online review of the Collège international de Philosophie: http://www.ciph.org/fichiers_contreAllee/F%20Forestier%20p%20C-All%C3%A9e.pdf.
  4. Greisch, J. 2000. Le cogito herméneutique. Paris: Vrin.Google Scholar
  5. Heidegger, M. 1986. Being and time (French trans: Vezin. Paris: Gallimard; English trans: 1996. Joan Stambaugh). New York: SUNY Press.Google Scholar
  6. Husserl, E. 1900. Logische Untersuchungen, vol. 1. Tübingen: M. Niemeyer.Google Scholar
  7. Husserl, E. 1959. Recherches logiques, vol. 3. Paris: PUF.Google Scholar
  8. Husserl, E. 1970. Logical investigations, vol. 2. (trans: Findlay, J.N.). New York: Humanities Press.Google Scholar
  9. Kant, I. 1997. Prolegomena to any future metaphysics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Kühn, R. 2011. Le lieu originaire de la phénoménologie et la métaphysique. In La phénoménologie comme philosophie première, ed. K. Novotny, A. Schnell, and L. Tengelyi. Amiens/Prague: Mémoires des Annales de Phénoménologie & Filosofia.Google Scholar
  11. Maesschalck, M. 2011. L’attention spéculative en philosophie première chez Fichte et Schelling. In La phénoménologie comme philosophie première, ed. K. Novotny, A. Schnell, and L. Tengelyi. Amiens/Prague: Mémoires des Annales de Phénoménologie & Filosofia.Google Scholar
  12. Majolino, C. 2010. Husserl, Brentano et la psychologie descriptive. In Lectures de Husserl, ed. J. Benoist, and V. Gérard. Paris: Ellipses.Google Scholar
  13. Marion, J.-L. 1989. Réduction et donation: Recherches sur Husserl, Heidegger et la phénoménologie. Paris: PUF (trans: Thomas A. Carlson. 1998). Reduction and givenness: investigations of Husserl, Heidegger, and phenomenology. Evanston: Northwestern University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Marion, J.-L. 1998. Etant donné: essai d’une phénoménologie de la donation. Paris: PUF (trans: Jeffrey L. Kosky. 2002). Being given: toward a phenomenology of givenness. Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Marion, J.-L. 2002. Being given: Toward a phenomenology of givenness. Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Marion, J.-L. 2004. In excess: Studies of saturated phenomena. New York: Fordham University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Marquet, J.-F. 1996. Singularité et évènement. Grenoble: J. Millon.Google Scholar
  18. Novotny, K. 2011. Limites de la phénoménologie classique. In La phénoménologie comme philosophie première, ed. K. Novotny, A. Schnell, and L. Tengelyi. Amiens/Prague: Mémoires des Annales de Phénoménologie & Filosofia.Google Scholar
  19. Richir, M. 1992. Méditations Phénoménologiques. Grenoble: J. Millon.Google Scholar
  20. Richir, M. 2000a. Phénoménologie en Esquisses. Grenoble: J. Millon.Google Scholar
  21. Richir, M. 2000b. Métaphysique et phénoménologie, Prolégomènes pour une anthropologie phénoménologique. Phénoménologie française et phénoménologie allemande. Paris: L’Harmattan.Google Scholar
  22. Richir, M. 2002. L’institution de l’idéalité, Des schématismes. Beauvais: Mémoires des Annales de Phénoménologie.Google Scholar
  23. Richir, M. 2005. Pour une phénoménologie des racines archaïques de l’affectivité. Annales de phénoménologie 4.Google Scholar
  24. Richir, M. 2006. Fragments phénoménologiques sur le temps et l’espace. Grenoble: J. Millon.Google Scholar
  25. Richir, M. 2008a. La refonte de la phénoménologie. Annales de phénoménologie 7.Google Scholar
  26. Richir, M. 2008b. Variations sur le sublime et le soi. Grenoble: J. Millon.Google Scholar
  27. Schnell, A. 2004. Temps et phénomène. La phénoménologie husserlienne du temps (1893–1918). Hildesheim: Olms.Google Scholar
  28. Schnell, A. 2005. De l’existence ouverte au monde fini. Heidegger 1925–1930. Paris: Vrin.Google Scholar
  29. Schnell, A. 2007. Husserl et les fondements de la phénoménologie constructive. Grenoble: J. Millon.Google Scholar
  30. Schnell, A. 2011. Le sens se faisant. Bruxelles: Ousia.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre d’études de la philosophie classique allemande et de sa postérité (CEPCAP)Université Paris-SorbonneLyonFrance

Personalised recommendations