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Continental Philosophy Review

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 293–312 | Cite as

Lacan’s subversion of the subject

  • Ed PluthEmail author
Article

Abstract

I explore Lacan’s theory of the subject by responding to two well-known criticisms of it, found in Borch-Jacobsen’s Lacan and Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy’s The Title of the Letter. I argue that the relation of the subject to language is an important part of Lacan’s theory, but his conception of the subject cannot be reduced to language, as the critiques allege. The real must be included in the picture too. I then discuss the situation of Lacan’s subject between language and the real, and conclude with a contrast of Lacan’s subversion of the subject to a Derridean paleonymic approach.

Keywords

Symbolic Order Vital Immanence Mirror Stage Paternal Function Cartesian Cogito 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyCalifornia State UniversityChicoUSA

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