Organizational identification as a determinant of customer orientation in service organizations

Abstract

The marketing literature suggests that frontline employees are the central determinant of how customer-oriented a service organization is perceived to be by its customers. However, little is known about the contingencies of employees’ customer orientation (CO) beyond personality traits and broadly construed work attitudes. Based on the social identity approach, the present article develops a multilevel model whereby CO is the result of identity-based management of frontline employees. Two empirical studies in the travel industry show that employees’ CO depends on employees’ organizational identification and their leaders’ acting as role models of CO.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the German National Science Fund (WI 3146/1-1).

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Correspondence to Jan Wieseke.

Appendix

Appendix

Table 2 Construct measurement items

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Wieseke, J., Ullrich, J., Christ, O. et al. Organizational identification as a determinant of customer orientation in service organizations. Market Lett 18, 265–278 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11002-007-9021-2

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Keywords

  • Customer orientation
  • Organizational identification
  • Multilevel