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Pregnancy and Binge Drinking: An Intersectionality Theory Perspective Using Veteran Status and Racial/Ethnic Identity

Abstract

Objectives

Alcohol use during pregnancy is a critical public health issue that results in several adverse outcomes for both mother and child. While the prevalence of and consequences of binge drinking among pregnant women is well-documented in the literature, little is known about the intersectional effect of racial/ethnic identity and veteran status. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of binge drinking among pregnant women using the intersectionality of racial/ethnic identity and veteran status.

Methods

This study utilized combined data from the 2016, 2017 and 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The BRFSS is a telephone survey that collects health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions and use of preventative services among U.S residents. Generalized linear mixed models were used to examine the prevalence of binge drinking using the interaction between race/ethnicity and veteran status.

Results

Overall binge drinking prevalence was 3.60% among the sample of 6101 pregnant women. Binge drinking prevalence was the highest among racial/ethnic minority veterans at 17.42%, compared to 5.34% among white veterans, 4.05% among non-veteran racial/ethnic minorities and 3% among non-veteran whites, supporting the theory of intersectionality.

Conclusions

Intersectionality Theory suggests that the stressors from membership in two vulnerable groups may lead to increased disparities. The results of this study highlight the unique experience of being a veteran and identifying as a member of a racial/ethnic minority group. This calls for a need to customize preventative measures that address the combined impact of both racial/ethnic minority group status and veteran status.

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Funding

This study was not supported by any Grant.

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Correspondence to David L. Albright.

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The author declares that they have no conflict of interest.

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Albright, D.L., McDaniel, J., Suntai, Z. et al. Pregnancy and Binge Drinking: An Intersectionality Theory Perspective Using Veteran Status and Racial/Ethnic Identity. Matern Child Health J 25, 1345–1351 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-021-03171-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-021-03171-x

Keywords

  • Binge-drinking
  • Pregnancy
  • Racial/ethnic minority
  • Veteran
  • Race
  • Alcohol