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Maternal and Child Health Journal

, Volume 22, Issue 12, pp 1725–1737 | Cite as

Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant Priority Needs and Linked Performance Measures: Current Patterns and Trends (2000–2015)

  • Veni KandasamyEmail author
  • Ashley H. Hirai
  • Michael D. Kogan
  • Michele Lawler
  • Ellen Volpe
Article

Abstract

Objective As part of the Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services Block Grant, administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA’s) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), states are required to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment identifying MCH priorities every 5 years. The most current needs assessment (2015) occurred after a transformation of the program, in which a new performance measurement framework was created. This analysis examined current patterns and trends in state MCH priorities and selected performance measures to identify changing needs and inform technical support. Methods Multiple coders categorized: (1) state priority needs from 2000 to 2015 into focus areas and subcategories for examination of current, diminishing, and emerging needs; and (2) the selection of linked national and state performance measures in 2015 for all 59 states and jurisdictions. Results Between 2000 and 2015, the proportion of states with a need around pre- and inter-conception care increased from 19% to 66%. More states had needs in the breastfeeding subcategory (42%) compared with 20% of states or less in previous years. Fewer states had needs around data capacity than in past years. Emerging needs included supporting families/relationships. The most commonly selected national performance measures (NPMs) were around breastfeeding and well-woman visits. The state performance measures (SPMs) analysis also emphasized assets, with measures around community/context and positive development. Teen births and postpartum depression were areas where multiple states had SPMs. Conclusions for practice Increasing and emerging needs may help to inform technical assistance and future national measures for the Title V program.

Keywords

Title V Priority needs Measures 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Coders: Part 1: Jennifer O’Brien, Carolyn Gleason, Ashley Hirai and Veni Kandasamy. Part 2: Ashley Hirai and Veni Kandasamy. Offices/Divisions: Division of State and Community Health Office of Epidemiology and Research.

Funding

This research was supported in part by an appointment to the Postgraduate Research Participation Program at the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Maternal and Child Health Bureau administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education through an interagency agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and HRSA.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

No financial disclosures or other conflict of interest were reported by the authors of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Oak Ridge Institute for Science and EducationOak Ridge Associated UniversitiesOak RidgeUSA
  2. 2.US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Epidemiology and ResearchRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Division of State and Community HealthUS Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health BureauRockvilleUSA
  4. 4.RockvilleUSA

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