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Improving Access to Child Health Care in Indonesia Through Community Case Management

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Abstract

Objectives In order to reduce infant mortality in Indonesia, community case management (CCM) was introduced. CCM is a community-based service delivery model to improve children’s wellness and longevity, involving the delivery of lifesaving, curative interventions to address common childhood illnesses, particularly where there are limited facility-based services. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study that investigated the implementation of CCM in the Kutai Timur district, East Kalimantan Indonesia from the perspective of mothers who received care. Methods Seven mothers and health workers were observed during a consultation and these mothers were interviewed in their home weeks after delivery. Field notes and the interview transcriptions were analysed thematically. Findings Mothers reported that their access to care had improved, along with an increase in their knowledge of infant danger signs and when to seek care. Family compliance with care plans was also found to have improved. Mothers expressed satisfaction with the care provided under the CCM model. The mothers expressed a need for a nurse or midwife to be posted in each village, preferably someone from that village. However two mothers did not wish their children to receive health interventions as they did not believe these to be culturally appropriate. Conclusion CCM is seen by rural Indonesian mothers to be a helpful model of care in terms of increasing access to health care and the uptake of lifesaving interventions for sick children. However there is a need to modify the program to demonstrate cultural sensitivity and meet cultural needs of the target population. While CCM is a potentially effective model of care, further integrative strategies are required to embed this model into maternal and child health service delivery.

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Notes

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    A term designated to any object or action, which is permissible to use or engage in, according to Islamic law.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to acknowledge the Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP) and the Kutai Timur district health office and the families receiving care who enabled this research to be undertaken.

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Correspondence to Agus Setiawan.

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Setiawan, A., Dignam, D., Waters, C. et al. Improving Access to Child Health Care in Indonesia Through Community Case Management. Matern Child Health J 20, 2254–2260 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-016-2149-z

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Keywords

  • Child health
  • Access
  • Mothers
  • Community case management