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The Association Between Medicaid Coverage for Children and Parents Persists: 2002–2010

Abstract

To assess the association between a child’s and their parent’s public health insurance status during a time when children had access to coverage independent of policies that impacted adults’ access. Secondary data from the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) [Oregon’s Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs] for families with at least one parent and one child with OHP coverage at any time during the study period (2002–2010). We linked children to their parents in the OHP data set and examined longitudinal associations between the coverage patterns for children and their parents, controlling for several demographic and economic confounders. We tested for differences in the strength of associations in monthly coverage status in five time periods throughout the nine-year study period. The odds of a child being insured by the OHP in months in which at least one parent had OHP coverage were significantly higher than among children whose parents were not enrolled at that time. Children with at least one parent who maintained or gained OHP coverage in a given month had a much higher probability of being enrolled in the OHP in that month, compared to children who had no covered parents in the given month or the month prior. Despite implementation of policies that differentially affected eligibility requirements for children and adults, strong associations persisted between coverage continuity for parents and children enrolled in Oregon public health insurance programs.

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Acknowledgments

This work was financially supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Grant Number (1 R01 HS018569), the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and the Oregon Health & Science University Department of Family Medicine.

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Correspondence to Heather Angier.

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DeVoe, J.E., Crawford, C., Angier, H. et al. The Association Between Medicaid Coverage for Children and Parents Persists: 2002–2010. Matern Child Health J 19, 1766–1774 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-015-1690-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-015-1690-5

Keywords

  • Health insurance
  • Children’s health
  • Access to care
  • Medicaid
  • CHIP