Advertisement

Pointing things out: in defense of attention and coherence

  • Una StojnićEmail author
  • Matthew Stone
  • Ernie Lepore
Original Research
  • 54 Downloads

Abstract

Nowak and Michaelson (Linguist Philos,  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10988-019-09266-7, 2019) have done us the service of presenting direct and clear worries about our account of demonstratives. In response, we use the opportunity to engage briefly with their remarks as a useful way to clarify our view.

Keywords

Demonstratives Demonstrative gestures Demonstrations Coherence Context-sensitivity Context Demonstrative pronouns 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

References

  1. Asher, N., & Lascarides, A. (2003). Logics of conversation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Hawthorne, J., & Lepore, E. (2013). On words. Journal of Philosophy, 108(9), 447–485.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Kaplan, D. (1989a). Afterthoughts. In J. Almog, J. Perry, & H. Wettstein (Eds.), Themes from Kaplan (pp. 565–614). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Kaplan, D. (1989b). Demonstratives. In J. Almog, J. Perry, & H. Wettstein (Eds.), Themes from Kaplan (pp. 481–563). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Karttunen, L. (1974). Presuppositions and linguistic context. Theoretical Linguistics, 1, 181–194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kehler, Andrew. (2002). Coherence, reference and the theory of grammar. Stanford: CSLI Publications.Google Scholar
  7. Kendon, A. (2004). Gesture: Visible action as utterance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. King, J. C. (2014a). The metasemantics of contextual sensitivity. In A. Burgess & B. Sherman (Eds.), Metasemantics: New essays on the foundations of meaning (pp. 97–118). Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. King, J. C. (2014b). Speaker intentions in context. Noûs, 48, 219–237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Kripke, S. (1972). Naming and necessity. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Lepore, E., & Stone, M. (2015). Imagination and convention: Distinguishing grammar and inference in language. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Lepore, E., & Stone, M. (2017). Convention before communication. Philosophical Perspectives, 31, 245–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lewis, D. (1979). Scorekeeping in a language game. Journal of Philosophical Logic, 8(1), 339–359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Neale, S. (1990). Descriptions. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  15. Neale, S. (2004). This, that and the other. In M. Reimer & A. Bezuidenhout (Eds.), Descriptions and beyond (pp. 68–182). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Nowak, E., & Michaelson, E. (2019). Discourse and method. Linguistics and Philosophy.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10988-019-09266-7.
  17. Schiffer, S. (1981). Indexicals and the theory of reference. Synthese, 49(1), 43–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Shan, C. (2005). Linguistic side effects. PhD dissertation, Harvard University.Google Scholar
  19. Stalnaker, R. (1978). Assertion. Syntax and Semantics, 9, 315–332.Google Scholar
  20. Stalnaker, R. (2002). Common ground. Linguistics and Philosophy, 25(5–6), 701–721.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Stalnaker, R. (2014). Context. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Stojnić, U., Stone, M., & Lepore, E. (2013). Deixis (even without pointing). Philosophical Perspectives, 27, 502–525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Stojniić, U., Stone, M., & Lepore, E. (2017). Discourse and logical form: Pronouns, attention and coherence. Linguistics and Philosophy, 40(5), 519–547.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Zwicky, A. (1979). Classical malapropisms. Language Sciences, 1(2), 339–348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Computer Science and Center for Cognitive ScienceRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  3. 3.Department of Philosophy and Center for Cognitive ScienceRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

Personalised recommendations