Empowerment and relationships: A classroom model to enhance student motivation

Abstract

This project focused on the goal of establishing a classroom model of motivation in which the source of student motivation is based on internal mechanisms or structures, along with the establishment of greater self-regulatory opportunities for students, and which results in greater student empowerment and motivation. One-hundred current elementary and secondary teachers and 100 university preservice teacher education students completed a 40-item Likert-type questionnaire that focused on four classroom dimensions of affirmation, rejection, student empowerment and teacher control. The results of this project suggested that, although veteran and preservice teachers agreed on the need for teacher control in the classroom, there was less agreement about their perceptions of the need to create a classroom environment of positive affirmation and student empowerment. Implications for future research and the need for creating an affirming, empowering, motivational classroom environment are discussed in light of the limitations for teachers and schools to encourage these constructs associated with recent federal legislative policies.

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Correspondence to Joe D. Nichols.

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Nichols, J.D. Empowerment and relationships: A classroom model to enhance student motivation. Learning Environ Res 9, 149–161 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10984-006-9006-8

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Keywords

  • Classroom environment
  • Learner-centred classrooms
  • Motivation
  • Teacher education