Landscape Ecology

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 229–244 | Cite as

Multifunctionality of floodplain landscapes: relating management options to ecosystem services

  • Stefan Schindler
  • Zita Sebesvari
  • Christian Damm
  • Katrin Euller
  • Volker Mauerhofer
  • Anna Schneidergruber
  • Marianna Biró
  • Franz Essl
  • Róbert Kanka
  • Sophie G. Lauwaars
  • Christiane Schulz-Zunkel
  • Theo van der Sluis
  • Michaela Kropik
  • Viktor Gasso
  • Andreas Krug
  • Martin T. Pusch
  • Klaus Peter Zulka
  • Werner Lazowski
  • Christa Hainz-Renetzeder
  • Klaus Henle
  • Thomas Wrbka
Research Article

Abstract

The concept of green infrastructure has been recently taken up by the European Commission for ensuring the provision of ecosystem services (ESS). It aims at the supply of multiple ESS in a given landscape, however, the effects of a full suite of management options on multiple ESS and landscape multifunctionality have rarely been assessed. In this paper we use European floodplain landscapes as example to develop an expert based qualitative conceptual model for the assessment of impacts of landscape scale interventions on multifunctionality. European floodplain landscapes are particularly useful for such approach as they originally provided a high variety and quantity of ESS that has declined due to the strong human impact these landscapes have experienced. We provide an overview of the effects of floodplain management options on landscape multifunctionality by assessing the effects of 38 floodplain management interventions on 21 relevant ESS, as well as on overall ESS supply. We found that restoration and rehabilitation consistently increased the multifunctionality of the landscape by enhancing supply of provisioning, regulation/maintenance, and cultural services. In contrast, conventional technical regulation measures and interventions related to extraction, infrastructure and intensive land use cause decrease in multifunctionality and negative effects for the supply of all three aspects of ESS. The overview of the effects of interventions shall provide guidance for decision makers at multiple governance levels. The presented conceptual model could be effectively applied for other landscapes that have potential for a supply of a high diversity of ESS.

Keywords

Multifunctional landscapes Green infrastructure Nature conservation Environmental management Multifunctionality index Hydrological engineering Restoration Recreation Provisioning services Cultural services 

Supplementary material

10980_2014_9989_MOESM1_ESM.docx (109 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 108 kb)

References

  1. Angelstam P, Axelsson R, Elbakidze M, Laestadius L, Lazdinis M, Nordberg M, Pătru-Stupariu I, Smith M (2011) Knowledge production and learning for sustainable forest management on the ground: Pan-European landscapes as a time machine. Forestry 84:581–596Google Scholar
  2. Antrop M, Brandt J, Loupa-Ramos I, Padoa-Schioppa E, Porter J, Van Eetvelde V, Pinto-Correia T (2013) How landscape ecology can promote the development of sustainable landscapes in Europe: the role of the European Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE-Europe) in the twenty-first century. Landscape Ecol 28:1641–1647Google Scholar
  3. Balian E, Berhault A, Jones-Walters L, Torre‐Marin A, Neßhöver C, Vandewalle M (2012) Overview of experts and requesters of a potential NoK: mapping knowledge holders, identifying requesters and barriers on how to link them. Deliverable 1.1 of the EU-FP7-project KNEU. http://www.biodiversityknowledge.eu/images/Documents/Deliverables/KNEU-D1-1_clientsandholdersoverviewandbarriers_Final.pdf
  4. Balvanera P, Daily GC, Ehrlich PR, Ricketts TH, Bailey SA, Kark S, Kremen C, Pereira H (2001) Conserving biodiversity and ecosystem services. Science 291:2047Google Scholar
  5. Benedict MA, MacMahon ET (2002) Green infrastructure: smart conservation for the 21st century. Renew Res J 20:12–17Google Scholar
  6. Bernhardt ES, Palmer MA, Allan JD, Alexander G, Barnas K, Brooks S, Carr J, Clayton S, Dahm C, Follastad-Shah J, Galat D, Gloss S, Goodwin P, Hart D, Hassett B, Jenkinson R, Katz S, Kondolf GM, Lake PS, Lave R, Meyer JL, O’Donnell TK, Pagano L, Powell B, Sudduth E (2005) Synthesizing U.S. river restoration efforts. Science 308:636–637Google Scholar
  7. Bernhardt ES, Sudduth EB, Palmer MA, Allan JD, Meyer JL, Alexander G, Follastad-Shah J, Hassett B, Jenkinson R, Lave R, Rumps J, Pagano L (2007) Restoring rivers one reach at a time: results from a survey of US river restoration practitioners. Restor Ecol 15:482–493Google Scholar
  8. Burkhard B, Kroll F, Müller F, Windhorst W (2009) Landscapes’ capacities to provide ecosystem services—a concept for land-cover based assessments. Landscape Online 15:1–22Google Scholar
  9. Burkhard B, Kroll F, Nedkov S, Müller F (2012) Mapping supply, demand and budgets of ecosystem services. Ecol Indic 21:17–29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Butchart SHM, Walpole M, Collen B, van Strien A, Scharlemann JPW, Almond REA, Baillie JEM, Bomhard B, Brown C, Bruno J, Carpenter KE, Carr GM, Chanson J, Chenery AM, Csirke J, Davidson NC, Dentener F, Foster M, Galli A, Galloway JN, Genovesi P, Gregory RD, Hockings M, Kapos V, Lamarque J-F, Leverington F, Loh J, McGeoch MA, McRae L, Minasyan A, Hernández Morcillo M, Oldfield TEE, Pauly D, Quader S, Revenga C, Sauer JR, Skolnik B, Spear D, Stanwell-Smith D, Stuart SN, Symes A, Tierney M, Tyrrell TD, Vié J-C, Watson R (2010) Global biodiversity: indicators of recent declines. Science 328:1164–1168Google Scholar
  11. Capon SJ, Chambers LE, Mac Nally R, Naiman RJ, Davies P, Marshall N, Pittock J, Reid M, Capon T, Douglas M, Catford J, Baldwin DS, Stewardson M, Roberts J, Parsons M, Williams SE (2013) Riparian ecosystems in the 21st century: hotspots for climate change adaptation? Ecosystems 16:359–381Google Scholar
  12. Cardinale BJ, Duffy JE, Gonzalez A, Hooper DU, Perrings C, Venail P, Narwani A, Mace GM, Tilman D, Wardle DA, Kinzig AP, Daily GC, Loreau M, Grace JB, Larigauderie A, Srivastava D, Naeem S (2012) Biodiversity loss and its impact on humanity. Nature 486:59–67Google Scholar
  13. COM (2007) Directive 2007/60/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 23 October 2007 on the assessment and management of flood risks. Off. J. Eur. Union 2007, L288/27–L288/34Google Scholar
  14. COM (2009) Adapting to climate change: towards a European framework for action. European Commission, Brussels. COM 147, 2009. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2009:0147:FIN:EN:PDF
  15. COM (2011a) Our life insurance, our natural capital: an EU biodiversity strategy to 2020, Brussels. COM 244, 2011. http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/biodiversity/comm2006/pdf/2020/1_EN_ACT_part1_v7%5B1%5D.pdf
  16. COM (2011b) Regional policy contributing to sustainable growth in Europe 2020. European Commission, Brussels. COM 17, 2011. http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/official/communic/sustainable/comm2011_17_en.pdf
  17. Crossman ND, Burkhard B, Nedkov S, Willemen L, Petz K, Palomo I, Drakou EG, Martín-Lopez B, McPhearson T, Boyanova K, Alkemade R, Egoh B, Dunbar MB, Maes J (2013) A blueprint for mapping and modelling ecosystem services. Ecosyst Serv 4:4–14Google Scholar
  18. De Groot RS, Alkemade R, Braat L, Hein L, Willemen L (2010) Challenges in integrating the concept of ecosystem services and values in landscape planning, management and decision making. Ecol Complex 7:260–272CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Delpla I, Jung A-V, Baures E, Clement M, Thomas O (2009) Impacts of climate change on surface water quality in relation to drinking water production. Environ Int 35:1225–1233PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Dosskey M, Wells G, Bentrup G, Wallace D (2012) Enhancing ecosystem services: designing for multifunctionality. J Soil Water Conserv 67(2):37A–41ACrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Fagerholm N, Käyhkö N, Ndumbaro F, Khamis M (2012) Community stakeholders’ knowledge in landscape assessments—mapping indicators for landscape services. Ecol Indic 18:421–433CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Geilen N, Jochems H, Krebs L, Muller S, Pedroli B, van der Sluis T, van Looy K, van Rooij S (2004) Integration of ecological aspects in flood protection strategies: defining and ecological minimum. River Res Appl 20:269–283Google Scholar
  23. Geist J (2011) Integrative freshwater ecology and biodiversity conservation. Ecol Indic 11:1507–1516CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Haines-Young R, Potschin M (2013) Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services (CICES): Consultation on Version 4, August–December 2012. EEA Framework Contract No EEA/IEA/09/003Google Scholar
  25. Haines-Young R, Potschin M, Kienast F (2012) Indicators of ecosystem service potential at European scales: mapping marginal changes and trade-offs. Ecol Indic 21:39–53CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Heintz MD, Hagemeier-Klose M, Wagner K (2012) Towards a risk governance culture in flood policy—findings from the implementation of the “Floods Directive” in Germany. Water 4(1):135–156CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Hermann A, Kuttner M, Hainz-Renetzeder C, Konkoly-Gyuró É, Tirászi Á, Brandenburg C, Allex B, Ziener K, Wrbka T (2014) Assessment framework for landscape services in European cultural landscapes: an Austrian Hungarian case study. Ecol Indic 37(A):229–240Google Scholar
  28. Hoffmann CC, Kronvang B, Audet J (2011) Evaluation of nutrient retention in four restored Danish riparian wetlands. Hydrobiologia 674:5–24CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Jenkins WA, Murray BC, Kramer RA, Faulkner SP (2010) Valuing ecosystem services from wetlands restoration in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Ecol Econ 69:1051–1061CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Jongman RHG, Külvik M, Kristiansen I (2004) European ecological networks and greenways. Landscape Urban Plan 68:305–319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Jongman RHG, Bouwma IR, Griffioen A, Jones-Walters L, Van Doorn AM (2011) The Pan European ecological network: PEEN. Landscape Ecol 26:311–326CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Kandziora M, Burkhard B, Müller F (2013) Interactions of ecosystem properties, ecosystem integrity and ecosystem service indicators—a theoretical matrix exercise. Ecol Indic 28:54–78CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Kettunen M, Ten Brink P (2012) Nature, green economy and sustainable development: the outcomes of UN Rio + 20 Conference on Sustainable Development. Nat Conserv 2:1–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Koschke L, Fürst C, Frank S, Makeschin F (2012) A multi-criteria approach for an integrated land-cover-based assessment of ecosystem services provision to support landscape planning. Ecol Indic 21:54–66CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Lorenz AW, Korte T, Sundermann A, Januschke K, Haase P (2012) Macrophytes respond to reach-scale river restorations. J Appl Ecol 49:202–212CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Lovell ST, Johnston DM (2009) Designing landscapes for performance based on emerging principles in landscape ecology. Ecol Soc 14(1):44Google Scholar
  37. Mace GM, Norris K, Fitter AH (2012) Biodiversity and ecosystem services: a multilayered relationship. Trends Ecol Evol 27:19–26PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Maes J, Egoh B, Willemen L, Liquete C, Vihervaara P, Schägner JP, Grizzetti B, Drakou EG, La Notte A, Zulian G, Bouraoui F, Paracchini ML, Braat L, Bidoglio G (2012) Mapping ecosystem services for policy support and decision making in the European Union. Ecosyst Serv 1:31–39Google Scholar
  39. Maes J, Hauck J, Paracchini ML, Ratamäki O, Hutchins M, Termansen M, Furman E, Pérez-Soba M, Braat L, Bidoglio G (2013) Mainstreaming ecosystem services into EU policy. Environ Sustain 5:128–134Google Scholar
  40. MEA (2005) Ecosystems and human well-being: multiscale assessment, millennium Ecosystem assessment series 4. Island Press, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  41. Merz C, Winkler A, Pekdeger A (2009) Trace elements in streambed sediments of floodplains: consequences for water management measures. Environ Earth Sci 59:25–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Moss T, Monstadt J (2008) Restoring floodplains in Europe—policy contexts and project experiences. IWA Publishing, LondonGoogle Scholar
  43. Mueller M, Pander J, Geist J (2014) The ecological value of stream restoration measures: an evaluation on ecosystem and target species scales. Ecol Eng 62:129–139CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Nelson E, Mendoza G, Regetz J, Polasky S, Tallis H, Cameron DR, Chan KMA, Daily GC, Goldstein J, Kareiva PM, Lonsdorf E, Naidoo R, Ricketts TH, Shaw RM (2009) Modeling multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, commodity production, and tradeoffs at landscape scales. Front Ecol Environ 7(1):4–11Google Scholar
  45. Nijland H, Menke U (2005) In: Proceedings of the conference ‘Flood risk management and multifunctional land use in river catchments’. Mainz, October 2005. Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management, the NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  46. Pahl-Wostl C (2006) The importance of social learning in restoring the multifunctionality of rivers and floodplains. Ecol Soc 11(1):10Google Scholar
  47. Palmer MA, Filoso S (2009) Restoration of ecosystem services for environmental markets. Science 325:575–576PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Palomo I, Martín-López B, Potschin M, Haines-Young R, Montes C (2013) National Parks, buffer zones and surrounding lands: mapping ecosystem service flows. Ecosyst Serv 4:104–116CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Pander J, Geist J (2013) Ecological indicators for measuring stream restoration success. Ecol Indic 30:106–118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Pettifer E, Kay P (2012) The effects of flood defences on riparian vegetation species richness and abundance. Water Environ J 26:343–351CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Rey Benayas JM, Newton AC, Diaz A, Bullock JM (2009) Enhancement of biodiversity and ecosystem services by ecological restoration: a meta-analysis. Science 325:1121–1124PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Richter BD, Thomas GA (2007) Restoring flows by modifying dam operations. Ecol Soc 12(1):12Google Scholar
  53. Schindler S, Kropik M, Euller K, Bunting SW, Schulz-Zunkel C, Hermann A, Hainz-Renetzeder C, Kanka R, Mauerhofer V, Gasso V, Krug A, Laawars SG, Zulka KP, Henle K, Hoffmann M, Biró M, Essl F, Jaquier S, Balázs L, Borics G, Hudin S, Damm C, Pusch M, van der Sluis T, Sebesvari Z, Wrbka T (2013a) Floodplain management in temperate regions: is multifunctionality enhancing biodiversity? A systematic review protocol. Environ Evid 2:10Google Scholar
  54. Schindler S, Livoreil B, Sousa Pinto I, Araújo R, Zulka KP, Santamaría L, Euller K, Kropik M, Wrbka T (2013b) Final knowledge assessment reports of the 3 case studies and lessons learned. Deliverable 3.1 of the EU-FP7-project KNEU. http://www.biodiversityknowledge.eu/documents?layout=edit&id=88. Accessed Dec 2013
  55. Scholz M, Stab S, Dziok F, Henle K (2005) Lebensräume der Elbe und ihrer Auen (Band 4 in Konzepte für die nachhaltige Entwicklung einer Flusslandschaft). Weißensee-Verlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  56. Scholz M, Mehl D, Schulz-Zunkel C, Kasperdius HD, Born W, Henle K (2012) Ökosystemfunktionen von Flussauen. Analyse und Bewertung von Hochwasserretention, Nährstoffrückhalt, Kohlenstoffvorrat, Treibhausgasemissionen und Habitatfunktion. Naturschutz und Biologische Vielfalt 124:2Google Scholar
  57. Sedell JR, Richey JE, Swanson FJ (1989) The river continuum concept: a basis for the expected ecosystem behavior of very large rivers. In: Dodge DE (ed) Proceedings of the International Large River Symposium. Canadian Special Publication of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 106:49–55Google Scholar
  58. Seppelt R, Müller F, Schröder B, Volk M (2009) Challenges of simulating complex environmental systems at the landscape scale: a controversial dialogue between two cups of espresso. Ecol Model 220:3481–3489CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Seppelt R, Fath B, Burkhard B, Fisher JL, Grêt-Regamey A, Lautenbach S, Pert P, Hotes S, Spangenberg J, Verburg PH, van Oudenhovenm APE (2012) Form follows function? Proposing a blueprint for ecosystem service assessments based on reviews and case studies. Ecol Indic 21:145–154Google Scholar
  60. Solín Ľ, Feranec J, Nováček J (2011) Land cover changes in small catchments in Slovakia during 1990–2006 and their effects on frequency of flood events. Nat Hazards 56:195–214CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. TEEB (2010) In: Kumar P (ed) The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity: ecological and economic foundations. Earthscan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  62. Tockner K, Standford JA (2002) Riverine flooplains: present state and future trends. Environ Conserv 29:308–330CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Van der Sluis T, Degteva S, Pedroli G (2003) The Pechora River (Russia): reference system for Northwest European Rivers. International conference ‘Towards natural flood reduction strategies’. Warsaw, Poland, pp 6–13Google Scholar
  64. Van der Sluis T, Jongman RHG, Bouwma I, Wascher D (2012) Ein Europäischer Biotopverbund – Herausforderungen an den europäischen Kooperations- und Gestaltungswillen. Natur und Landschaft 87:415–419Google Scholar
  65. Vihervaara P, Kumpula T, Tanskanen A, Burkhard B (2010) Ecosystem services—a tool for sustainable management of human–environment systems. Case study Finnish Forest Lapland. Ecol Complex 7:410–420CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Welti N, Bondar-Kunze E, Tritthart M, Pinay G, Hein T (2011) Nitrogen dynamics in complex Danube River floodplain systems: effects of restoration. River Syst 20:71–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Werners S, Flachner Z, Matczak P, Falaleeva M, Leemans R (2009) Exploring earth system governance: a case study of floodplain management along the Tisza river in Hungary. Global Environ Chang 19:503–511CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Schindler
    • 1
    • 15
  • Zita Sebesvari
    • 2
  • Christian Damm
    • 3
  • Katrin Euller
    • 1
  • Volker Mauerhofer
    • 4
  • Anna Schneidergruber
    • 1
  • Marianna Biró
    • 5
  • Franz Essl
    • 1
    • 6
  • Róbert Kanka
    • 7
  • Sophie G. Lauwaars
    • 8
  • Christiane Schulz-Zunkel
    • 9
  • Theo van der Sluis
    • 10
  • Michaela Kropik
    • 1
  • Viktor Gasso
    • 11
  • Andreas Krug
    • 12
  • Martin T. Pusch
    • 13
  • Klaus Peter Zulka
    • 6
  • Werner Lazowski
    • 14
  • Christa Hainz-Renetzeder
    • 1
  • Klaus Henle
    • 9
  • Thomas Wrbka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Conservation Biology, Vegetation & Landscape EcologyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS)BonnGermany
  3. 3.Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Geography and Geoecology, Division WWF-Institute of Floodplain EcologyRastattGermany
  4. 4.United Nations University, Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS), 6F International Organizations Center Pacifico-YokohamaYokohamaJapan
  5. 5.Centre for Ecological Research, Institute of Ecology and BotanyHungarian Academy of SciencesVácrátótHungary
  6. 6.Environment Agency Austria (EAA)ViennaAustria
  7. 7.Institute of Landscape Ecology, Slovak Academy of Sciences (ILE SAS)BratislavaSlovakia
  8. 8.RijkswaterstaatMinistry of Infrastructure and EnvironmentUtrechtThe Netherlands
  9. 9.Department of Conservation BiologyUFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental ResearchLeipzigGermany
  10. 10.Alterra, Wageningen URWageningenThe Netherlands
  11. 11.Oles Honchar Dnipropetrovsk National UniversityDnipropetrovskUkraine
  12. 12.Federal Agency for Nature ConservationBonnGermany
  13. 13.Department of Ecosystem ResearchLeibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland FisheriesBerlinGermany
  14. 14.Technisches Büro für ÖkologieViennaAustria
  15. 15.CIBIO-Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos/InBioUniversidade do PortoVairãoPortugal

Personalised recommendations