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An Alternative Research and Science Teacher Preparation Agenda for Urban Science Education: An Insider’s Call for a Focus on Success

Abstract

There are some small urban high schools that have high levels of student engagement in science. However, much of the science education research and student teacher placement in urban areas is done in large, somewhat dysfunctional schools. Those who have created these effective environments for science show that it is only in the whole school context in which these effective science classrooms exist and the matrix of interactions organized by the teachers outside the science classroom that leads to this success. The theory and research behind the success of this matrix of interactions that differentiates these effective classrooms from traditional inner city science classrooms is presented. Implications for science teacher educators are also presented.

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Correspondence to Paul C. Jablon.

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Jablon, P.C. An Alternative Research and Science Teacher Preparation Agenda for Urban Science Education: An Insider’s Call for a Focus on Success. J Sci Teacher Educ 23, 221–231 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10972-012-9265-4

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Keywords

  • Urban education
  • Science education
  • Science teacher preparation
  • Urban education research
  • Small urban schools