Alternate Conceptions of Preservice Elementary Teachers: The Itakura Method

Abstract

In this study, we determined the effectiveness of the inquiry-based Itakura method for mediating alternate conceptions of preservice elementary teachers (N = 38) in an integrated mathematics, science, and technology methods course. We investigated alternate conceptions in the expansion of solids due to heating. There was a significant increase in participants’ immediate learning gains after participating in the Itakura method. Retention data was gathered after 1, 2, and 3 months. After 3 months, retention levels dropped slightly, but not significantly. Responses revealed that the majority of the participants did not revert back to alternate conceptions after 3 months.

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Correspondence to Aaron D. Isabelle.

Appendices

Appendix A: Preassessment (P) and Immediate Postassessment (PA0)

figurea

Appendix B: 1-, 2-, and 3-Month Postassessment (PA1, PA2, PA3)

figureb

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Isabelle, A.D., de Groot, C. Alternate Conceptions of Preservice Elementary Teachers: The Itakura Method. J Sci Teacher Educ 19, 417–435 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10972-008-9105-8

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Keywords

  • Preservice Teacher
  • Conceptual Change
  • Alternate Conception
  • Preservice Elementary Teacher
  • Bridge Girder