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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 314, Issue 1, pp 387–393 | Cite as

A radioactive tracer dilution method to determine the mass of molten salt

  • Lei CaoEmail author
  • Josh Jarrell
  • Susan White
  • Kevin Herminghuysen
  • Andrew Kauffman
  • Douglas E. Hardtmayer
  • Jeff Sanders
  • Shelly Li
Article

Abstract

A new technique for molten salt mass determination, termed radioactive tracer dilution, that uses 22Na as a tracer was validated at bench scale. It has been a challenging problem to determine the mass of molten salt in irregularly shaped containers, where a highly radioactive, high-temperature molten salt was used to process nuclear spent/used fuel during electrochemical recycling (pyro-processing) or for coolant/fuel salt from molten salt reactors. A radioactive source with known activity is dissolved into the salt. After a complete mixture, a small amount of the salt is sampled and measured in terms of its mass and radioactivity. By finding the ratio of the mass to radioactivity, the unknown salt mass in the original container can be precisely determined.

Keywords

Radioactive tracer Molten salt Mass determination Volume Pyro-processing Molten salt reactor 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the financial support from Laboratory Directed Research & Development from U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lei Cao
    • 1
    Email author
  • Josh Jarrell
    • 1
  • Susan White
    • 2
  • Kevin Herminghuysen
    • 2
  • Andrew Kauffman
    • 2
  • Douglas E. Hardtmayer
    • 1
  • Jeff Sanders
    • 3
  • Shelly Li
    • 3
  1. 1.Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, College of EngineeringThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  3. 3.Fuel Cycle Science and TechnologyIdaho National LaboratoryIdaho FallsUSA

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