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Leaves of woody plants as bio-indicators of radionuclides in forest ecosystems

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Abstract

Leaves of Evodia roxburghiana and Elaeocarpus oblongus, and their associated soil samples, were collected from Western Ghats, India, and analysed as bio-indicators of radionuclides. Concentrations of 40K and 210Po in leaves and soils were measured using a gamma ray spectrometer and an alpha counter. The transfer factor (TF) of these radionuclides to the plants from the underlying soil was calculated. From a careful analysis of the results, leaves of E. roxburghiana and E. oblongus are identified as bioindicators to monitor fallout radionuclides. From the seasonal study, it was found that mean values of TF were significantly higher in their earlier days of life than when they were getting mature.

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Acknowledgments

The authors are thankful to Dr A. Natarajan (Head, HASL, IGCAR), Dr A.R. Lakshmanan (HASL, IGCAR) and Dr A.R. Iyengar (Head, ESL, Kalpakkam) for their constant encouragement while this work was being undertaken.

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Correspondence to P. K. Manigandan.

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Manigandan, P.K., Chandar Shekar, B. Leaves of woody plants as bio-indicators of radionuclides in forest ecosystems. J Radioanal Nucl Chem 303, 911–917 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10967-014-3612-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10967-014-3612-1

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