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Applying INAA to assess dietary intake of elements through fish from coastal areas near Vishakhapatnam, India

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Abstract

Essential and toxic element concentrations were measured in fish from coastal areas of Pudimadaka near Vishakhapatnam by neutron activation analysis. Elemental concentrations were observed to be within guideline values fit for human consumption. Correlation among elements suggests similar biogeochemical properties and possibly similar sources. The daily dietary intake values were comparable with reported literature from India and ICRP reference man. Hazard Quotients for all elements were <1. These data will serve as baseline values of elemental concentrations that can be compared with future elemental levels during the operational and post-operational stages of the nuclear facility to be set up at this location. They can also be useful for further studies to identify the spatial and seasonal variations of elements in fish species and monitor the concentration level of elements in this region.

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Acknowledgments

Authors gratefully acknowledge the guidance and encouragement of Dr. D. N. Sharma, Director, Health Safety and Environment Group, BARC. The help and support received from Prof. N. Someswara Rao and his team of Andhra University, Visakhapatnam during sampling around the study site. The help of Shri Sumesh C. G and Shri Krishna N. S. of HS&EG, BARC during sample collection and processing is acknowledged.

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Patra, A.C., Mohapatra, S., Kumar, A.V. et al. Applying INAA to assess dietary intake of elements through fish from coastal areas near Vishakhapatnam, India. J Radioanal Nucl Chem 303, 315–323 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10967-014-3419-0

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