The Adolescent Society Revisited: Cultures, Crowds, Climates, and Status Structures in Seven Secondary Schools

The authors used data from seven schools in a metropolitan region to explore continuity and change in adolescent cultures and status structures; they identified six major types of status structures and explained variation among them in terms of characteristics of communities and schools. A key feature of the study is comparison of school climates, using both survey data and qualitative case studies that provide an interpretive context for the survey responses; this methodology allows a contextual level of analysis that is unavailable in either single-school ethnographies or large data sets that aggregate responses from individuals situated in many schools.

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Correspondence to Roberta Garner.

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Roberta Garner is Professor of Sociology at DePaul University. She received a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago (1966). Her interests are in sociological theory, political sociology, and the sociology of culture.

Judith Bootcheck is Associate Professor of Sociology at DePaul University and received the Ph.D. from Purdue University (1969). Her interests are in youth and the aging, families, and social problems

Michael Lorr is a Ph.D. student in Urban Studies at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He received an MA in sociology from DePaul (2002) and his interests are in sociology of culture, political sociology, and sociology of education

Kathryn Rauch received an MA from DePaul University with a focus on sociology of education and youth

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Garner, R., Bootcheck, J., Lorr, M. et al. The Adolescent Society Revisited: Cultures, Crowds, Climates, and Status Structures in Seven Secondary Schools. J Youth Adolescence 35, 1023–1035 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-006-9060-7

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KEY WORDS:

  • adolescent society
  • youth culture
  • peers
  • high schools
  • status structure
  • social change