Public policy measures in support of knowledge transfer activities: a review of academic literature

Abstract

Despite the wealth of academic studies that analyze different policy measures and initiatives implemented by national or regional governments to support knowledge transfer from academia to industry, scant systematization efforts seek to integrate these disparate lines of research. The systematic review of academic studies on public policy measures in support of technology transfer presented by this article suggests a literature classification based on two dimensions: the type of policy measure analyzed, and the focus of the study (i.e., policy design vs. impact assessment). On the basis of this comprehensive review, we summarize the lessons learned thus far, identify research gaps that continue to limit insights into public policy measures for technology transfer, and highlight directions for further research.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    A recente exception is represented by the study by Munari et al. (2015) analyzing the impact of university-oriented seed funds in Europe. This study, however, does not consider in detail the sources of capital (public vs. private) for such funds.

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Acknowledgments

Financial support by the EC project 217299 InnoS&T and the EIBURS programme of the European Investment Bank (“Financing Knowledge Transfer in Europe”—FiNKT project) is gratefully acknowledged.

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Kochenkova, A., Grimaldi, R. & Munari, F. Public policy measures in support of knowledge transfer activities: a review of academic literature. J Technol Transf 41, 407–429 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10961-015-9416-9

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Keywords

  • Public policy measures
  • Government support of technology transfer
  • Commercialization of university research
  • Knowledge transfer from academia to industry

JEL Classification

  • M13
  • O31
  • O38