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Development of the Educational and Career Interest Scale in Science, Technology, and Mathematics for High School Students

Abstract

The Educational and Career Interest scale, a self-report instrument measuring high school students’ educational and career interest in STEM, was developed and validated in two studies conducted during 2010 and 2011. Study 1 included data from 92 high school students, in which exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with an initial item pool of 20 items. EFA identified three factors: educational and career interest in science, educational and career interest in technology, and educational and career interest in mathematics. Study 2 utilized data from 658 students to revisit the three-factor model using confirmative factor analysis. The two studies provide strong evidence that the scale is both valid and reliable.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the US Department of Education, Investing in Innovation (i3) Program Grant #U396C100520 and the National Science Foundation, Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program Grant #1029472.

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Correspondence to Youn Joo Oh.

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Oh, Y.J., Jia, Y., Lorentson, M. et al. Development of the Educational and Career Interest Scale in Science, Technology, and Mathematics for High School Students. J Sci Educ Technol 22, 780–790 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-012-9430-8

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Keywords

  • Educational and career interest
  • STEM
  • Factor analysis
  • Instrument development