Religiosity and Suicide: A Large-Scale International and Individual Analysis Considering the Effects of Different Religious Beliefs

Abstract

In a cohort of 82,898 participants from 60 countries, this study examined attitudes towards suicide among five religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and other non-specific religions), while simultaneously considering two different dimensions of religiosity: subjective religiosity and religious practices. At the national level, religiosity was an important negative predictor variable for suicide rates and an important positive predictor variable for negative attitudes towards suicide. At the individual level, however, attitudes towards suicide were found to vary significantly across the different religions. The findings emphasize the importance of considering religion perspectives and religiosity, along with its practices and subjective dimensions, in prevention and attention programmes to suicidal behaviour.

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Funding

The first author was sponsored by the Del Amo Program from the Complutense University of Madrid. The study was completed independently without additional funding.

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Correspondence to Jesús Saiz.

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Saiz, J., Ayllón-Alonso, E., Sánchez-Iglesias, I. et al. Religiosity and Suicide: A Large-Scale International and Individual Analysis Considering the Effects of Different Religious Beliefs. J Relig Health (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-020-01137-x

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Keywords

  • Suicide
  • Attitude towards suicide
  • Religion
  • World values survey
  • Cross-cultural