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Repetition Compulsion Revisited in Relational Family Therapy: The Discovery of Old in Order to Develop Something New

  • Christian Gostečnik
  • Tanja Repič Slavič
  • Tanja Pate
  • Robert Cvetek
Psychological Exploration
  • 50 Downloads

Abstract

Psychoanalysis has always been full of diversity and controversy, in the theoretical field and especially in the plasticity and variety of its modalities and approaches. Yet all these theories are based on the premise that individuals compulsively repeat their old psycho-organic content, both in their personal lives and in analysis; the premise of Relational Family Therapy is that old emotional, behavioral and bodily complications must first be repeated before being fully processed so that something new can be created.

Keywords

Compulsive repetition of psycho-organic content Blocked developmental needs Transference-countertransference dynamics Health dialog Salvation process 

Notes

Funding

This study was funded by Slovenian Research Agency (Project No. J5-6825).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department for Marital and Family Therapy, Psychology and Sociology of Religion, Faculty of TheologyUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  2. 2.Franciscan Family InstituteLjubljanaSlovenia

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