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The Interrelation of Prayer and Worship Service Attendance in Moderating the Negative Impact of Life Event Stressors on Mental Well-Being

Abstract

The interrelation of worship service attendance and private prayer in moderating the negative impact of life event stressors on mental well-being is examined using hierarchical multiple regressions on a national sample of 2601 Americans. A theoretical model is proposed in which stressful life events are made less distressing under conditions in which exposure to pro-social content at worship services is internalized through frequent private prayer. Interactive models controlling for a block of potential confounds are run to confirm that the stress-moderating effects of worship service attendance are noted only when attendance is complemented by relatively frequent engagement in private prayer.

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Correspondence to G. Rainville.

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G. Rainville declares no conflicts of interest.

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Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Rainville, G. The Interrelation of Prayer and Worship Service Attendance in Moderating the Negative Impact of Life Event Stressors on Mental Well-Being. J Relig Health 57, 2153–2166 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-017-0494-x

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Keywords

  • Prayer
  • Stress
  • Mental health
  • Moderation models