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Destroying God’s Temple? Physical Inactivity, Poor Diet, Obesity, and Other “Sin” Behaviors

Abstract

On average, our participants (N = 112), who self-proclaimed to be Christians, believed that physically inactive lifestyles, unhealthy eating, overeating, and being obese destroy the body, God’s temple. However, these beliefs were less definitive, than those of other common “sin” behaviors, such as drug use, smoking, and excessive drinking of alcohol. In addition, destroying the body with physical inactivity or poor diet was not necessarily viewed as sinful. Subsequently, these beliefs did not relate to self-reported physical activity, dietary behavior, or body mass index. It is possible that inactivity, poor dietary habits, and obesity are not internalized into the spiritual perspective as destroying the body, God’s temple, in the same way as other “sin” behaviors.

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Correspondence to Mark D. Faries.

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Faries, M.D., McClendon, M. & Jones, E.J. Destroying God’s Temple? Physical Inactivity, Poor Diet, Obesity, and Other “Sin” Behaviors. J Relig Health 59, 522–534 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-017-0368-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-017-0368-2

Keywords

  • Physical inactivity
  • Poor diet
  • Health
  • God’s temple
  • Sin