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The Place of Faith for Consultant Obstetricians Following Stillbirth: A Qualitative Exploratory Study

Abstract

Stillbirth remains among the most challenging areas in obstetric practice. The objectives of this study were to explore the impact of stillbirth on the faith of obstetricians. Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with obstetricians focusing on the impact of stillbirth on their faith. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Stillbirth was identified as one of the most difficult experiences, and most consultants were unable to engage with their personal beliefs when dealing with death at work. The major study themes were conflict of personal faith and incongruence between personal faith and professional practice. This study highlights a gap in how obstetricians see their own faith and feeling able to respond to the faith needs of bereaved parents. Participating obstetricians did not demonstrate that spirituality was an integrated part of their professional life.

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Correspondence to Daniel Nuzum.

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Nuzum, D., Meaney, S. & O’Donoghue, K. The Place of Faith for Consultant Obstetricians Following Stillbirth: A Qualitative Exploratory Study. J Relig Health 55, 1519–1528 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-015-0077-7

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Keywords

  • Spirituality
  • Faith
  • Obstetricians
  • Stillbirth