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Religiousness and Mental Health: Systematic Review Study

Abstract

Many people use religious beliefs and practices to cope with stressful life events and derive peace of mind and purpose in life. The goal of this paper was to systematically review the recent psychological literature to assess the role of religion in mental health outcomes. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using medical and psychological databases on the relationship between religiosity and mental health. Seventy-four articles in the English and Arabic languages published between January 2000 and March 2012 were chosen. Despite the controversial relationship between religion and psychiatry, psychology, and medical care, there has been an increasing interest in the role which spirituality and religion play in mental health. The findings of past research showed that religion could play an important role in many situations, as religious convictions and rules influence the believer’s life and health care. Most of the past literature in this area reported that there is a significant connection between religious beliefs and practices and mental health.

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Correspondence to Norzarina Mohd Zaharim.

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AbdAleati, N.S., Mohd Zaharim, N. & Mydin, Y.O. Religiousness and Mental Health: Systematic Review Study. J Relig Health 55, 1929–1937 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-014-9896-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-014-9896-1

Keywords

  • Psychological problems
  • Depression
  • Suicidal ideas
  • Drug abuse
  • Religiousness and mental health