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Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 2082–2095 | Cite as

Re-membrance

  • Charles B. Rodning
Psychological Exploration
  • 139 Downloads

Abstract

Traced sufficiently remotely, all people, profanum vulgus, share a common familial and linguistic heritage. Several Occidental and Oriental religiophilosophical traditions and General Systems (neuro-linguistic/neuro-semantic) Theory propound that resolution of personal illness and intra- and inter-generational psychological conflicts among individuals and within society mandates a figurative, if not a literal return, to the source of conflict or contention—to RE-MEMBER with that source—if healing, peace, resolution, concord, solace, sustenance, and wholeness are to be achieved. Words that communicate effectively, linguistic symbols such as water and the cross, and the action of laying-on-of-hands are methodologies that reaffirm a personal commonality among all traditions and facilitate RE-MEMBRANCE. For those who adhere to the Judeo-Christocentric tradition—who are called and chosen to witness and serve through the sacrament of baptism—healing, support, and sustenance are achieved by RE-MEMBRANCE through the Triune God.

Keywords

RE-MEMBRANCE General Systems Theory Healing Peace Resolution Baptism Eucharist Laying-on-of-hands 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author expresses gratitude to Ms. Betty J. (Morris) Pledger, Secretary V, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Medical Center, University of South Alabama, for typing the manuscript superbly. The author is without conflicts of interest or financial enticements.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Medical CenterUniversity of South AlabamaMobileUSA

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