Examining the Effects of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) on the Irrational Beliefs of Blue-Chip Professionals

Abstract

The extant literature reveals a scarcity of research applying rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) in business settings. Against the backdrop of severe market conditions and inevitable involuntary job loss, the application of psychological interventions to reduce mental and physical health issues is highly pertinent and potentially valuable. This paper reports the effects of an intensive REBT programme on the irrational beliefs of staff undergoing redundancy from a Blue-Chip organisation. A repeated-measures single-group intervention design was adopted so that changes in irrational beliefs could be assessed over the course of the REBT programme. Results indicated significant reductions in total irrational beliefs, other-depreciation, need for achievement, and demand for fairness from pretest to posttest phases. Social validation data indicated perceived psychological and performance benefits. Results are discussed with reference to mechanisms of change, study limitations, and applied research issues.

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Turner, M.J., Barker, J.B. Examining the Effects of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) on the Irrational Beliefs of Blue-Chip Professionals. J Rat-Emo Cognitive-Behav Ther 33, 17–36 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10942-014-0200-9

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Keywords

  • Business
  • Emotions
  • Applied psychology
  • Intervention
  • Job loss
  • Social validation