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Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: How is it Different with Older People?

Abstract

This paper discusses the treatment of depression in older adults (over age 65) using cognitive therapy techniques first developed by Beck and colleagues. The focus of this paper concerns whether modifications of CBT are required in order to ensure maximal efficacy and discusses what modifications may be suitable by advocating conceptual and theoretical reasons for their adoption. Some important contextual factors may need to be taken account of when working with older people such as dealing with expectancies about lifespan, the likelihood of chronic physical illness and longevity and chronicity of the personal history of problems. It is our contention that much more has been written about outcome in CBT with older people than has been written about psychotherapy process issues. This paper aims to address this perceived gap in the literature.

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Correspondence to Ken Laidlaw.

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Laidlaw, K., McAlpine, S. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: How is it Different with Older People?. J Rat-Emo Cognitive-Behav Ther 26, 250–262 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10942-008-0085-6

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Keywords

  • Cognitive behaviour therapy
  • Late life depression
  • Psychotherapy process issues
  • Successful ageing
  • Gerontology and geropychology