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Evaluating the Effect of Work Incentives Benefits Counseling on Employment Outcomes of Transition-Age and Young Adult Supplemental Security Income Recipients with Intellectual Disabilities: A Case Control Study

Abstract

Purpose Work incentives benefits counseling (WIBC) can be a strong facilitator contributing to improved employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) by providing information about how income may affect disability benefits eligibility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of WIBC as a VR intervention to improve on employment outcomes and earnings of transition-age youth and young adults with ID who are Supplemental Security Income benefits recipients using a propensity score matching analysis approach. Propensity score matching using logistic regression analysis and the nearest neighbour method was conducted to equalize the treatment (received WIBC) and control groups (not received WIBC) on the six prominent demographic covariates. The treatment group had higher rates of employment, higher hourly wages than the control group, while the treatment group worked less hours per week than the control group. Methods Propensity score matching using logistic regression analysis and the nearest neighbour method was conducted to equalize the treatment (received WIBC) and control groups (not received WIBC) on the six prominent demographic covariates. Results The treatment group had higher rates of employment, higher hourly wages than the control group, while the treatment group worked less hours per week than the control group. Conclusions Findings of the present study can be used by policy makers, transition specialists, rehabilitation counselors, and other disability service providers to increase employment outcomes and earnings for individuals with ID through WIBC services. Future research and practice implications are provided.

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Acknowledgement

The contents of the journal publication were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RTEM0003). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this journal article do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Funding

This study was funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RTEM0003).

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Correspondence to Kanako Iwanaga.

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Iwanaga, K., Wehman, P., Brooke, V. et al. Evaluating the Effect of Work Incentives Benefits Counseling on Employment Outcomes of Transition-Age and Young Adult Supplemental Security Income Recipients with Intellectual Disabilities: A Case Control Study. J Occup Rehabil 31, 581–591 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10926-020-09950-7

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Keywords

  • Work incentives benefits counseling
  • Transition
  • Supplemental security income
  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Employment
  • Vocational rehabilitation
  • Propensity score matching