Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 39, Issue 4, pp 355–370

Dominant Voices and Attractive Faces: The Contribution of Visual and Auditory Information to Integrated Person Impressions

  • Constantin Rezlescu
  • Tegan Penton
  • Vincent Walsh
  • Hikaru Tsujimura
  • Sophie K. Scott
  • Michael J. Banissy
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10919-015-0214-8

Cite this article as:
Rezlescu, C., Penton, T., Walsh, V. et al. J Nonverbal Behav (2015) 39: 355. doi:10.1007/s10919-015-0214-8

Abstract

Faces and voices, in isolation, prompt consistent social evaluations. However, most human interactions involve both seeing and talking with another person. Our main goal was to investigate how facial and vocal information are combined to reach an integrated person impression. In Study 1, we asked participants to rate faces and voices separately for perceived trustworthiness, attractiveness, and dominance. Most previous studies relied on stimuli in which extra-vocal information (e.g., verbal content, prosody) may have confounded voice-based effects; to prevent these unwanted influences, we used brief, neutral vowel sounds. Voices, like faces, led to the formation of highly reliable impressions. Voice trustworthiness correlated with voice attractiveness, mirroring the relation between face trustworthiness and attractiveness, but did not correlate with voice dominance. Inconsistent with the possibility that face and voice evaluations are indicative of real character traits, we found no positive correlations between judgments of trustworthiness or dominance based on faces and the same judgments based on voices (there was also no correlation between face attractiveness and voice attractiveness). In Study 2, we asked participants to evaluate male targets after seeing their faces and hearing their voices. Faces and voices contributed equally to judgments of trustworthiness and combined to produce a significant interaction effect. For attractiveness, faces were given more weight than voices, possibly due to the predominantly visual character of the attractiveness concept (there was no interaction effect). For dominance, the reverse pattern was true, with voices having a larger effect than faces on final judgments. In this case the auditory cues may be perceived to be more reliable because of the strong links between voice pitch, masculinity, and dominance.

Keywords

Person perception Trait judgments Voice evaluations Trustworthiness Dominance 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Constantin Rezlescu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tegan Penton
    • 3
  • Vincent Walsh
    • 4
  • Hikaru Tsujimura
    • 3
  • Sophie K. Scott
    • 4
  • Michael J. Banissy
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain SciencesUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyGoldsmiths UniversityLondonUK
  4. 4.Institute of Cognitive NeuroscienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK

Personalised recommendations