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Gaze Cueing Effect in a Face-to-Face Situation

Abstract

People are faster to detect a target looked at, rather than ignored or not cued, by another person. This gaze cueing effect (GCE) reflects joint attention processes which play a crucial role in social interactions. To date, GCE has only been measured with on-screen experiments. This only approximates the real situation of joint attention which involves a triadic interaction between oneself, another person, and an external object. Here, we present an innovative experimental setup to investigate GCE in a face-to-face situation. We show a robust GCE, which is of the same size range as in on-screen experiments. This study fosters an ecological approach of joint attention.

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Correspondence to Nathalie George.

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Lachat, F., Conty, L., Hugueville, L. et al. Gaze Cueing Effect in a Face-to-Face Situation. J Nonverbal Behav 36, 177–190 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-012-0133-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-012-0133-x

Keywords

  • Joint attention
  • Gaze cueing
  • Real stimuli
  • Face-to-face interaction
  • Social cognition