Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 149–180 | Cite as

Psychosocial Correlates of Interpersonal Sensitivity: A Meta-Analysis

  • Judith A. Hall
  • Susan A. Andrzejewski
  • Jennelle E. Yopchick
Original Paper

Abstract

This meta-analysis examines how interpersonal sensitivity (IS), defined as accurate judgment or recall of others’ behavior or appearance, is related to psychosocial characteristics of the perceiver, defined as personality traits, social and emotional functioning, life experiences, values, attitudes, and self-concept. For 215 independent studies reported in 96 published sources, higher IS was generally associated with favorable or adaptive psychosocial functioning. Significant mean correlations were found for 27 of the 40 categories of psychosocial variables; these categories covered many different personality traits, indicators of mental health, and social and work-related competencies. Moreover, many additional studies that fell outside these conceptual categories also showed significant positive relations between IS and numerous other psychosocial variables. Taken together, the results support the construct validity of IS tests and demonstrate that IS is associated with many important aspects of personal and social functioning.

Keywords

Interpersonal sensitivity Accuracy Nonverbal communication Personality Psychosocial Meta-analysis 

References

Note: Entries marked with “D” (for data) contributed quantitative data to the meta-analysis; entries marked with “P” (for psychosocial) are the sources for the published psychosocial variables; and entries marked with “T” (for test) are the citations for the published interpersonal sensitivity tests listed in Table 2.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith A. Hall
    • 1
  • Susan A. Andrzejewski
    • 1
  • Jennelle E. Yopchick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, 125 NINortheastern UniversityBostonUSA

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