Skip to main content

Improving Doctor–Patient Communication: Examining Innovative Modalities Vis-à-vis Effective Patient-Centric Care Management Technology

Abstract

This analysis investigates what patients and practitioners can do to improve their interactive communications to achieve optimal patient-centric (PC) care. One goal of this clinical practice approach is to improve patient satisfaction, compliance, and outcomes. The mutual responsibilities required of both the patients and practitioners to attain PC care are discussed. Innovative, information technology techniques in the healthcare environment in general and in care delivery in particular are explored. Practitioner-to-patient encouragement vis-à-vis self education on their conditions is also provided.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1

References

  1. Audet, A., Davis, K., and Schoenbaum, S., Adoption of patient-centered care practices by physicians: Results from a national survey. Arch. Intern. Med. 166:754–759, 2006.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Edlin, M., Plans adopt patient-centered approaches to treat rare diseases. Manag. Healthc. Exec. 12:32–36, 2002.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Montreuil, B., and Garon, R., Toward patient-centric and distributed health care delivery networks. Clin Invest. Med. 28:351–352, 2005.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Steinberg, E., Patient-centric communications drive quality, fiscally prudent healthcare decisions. Empl. Benefit Plan Rev. 60:11–13, 2006.

    Google Scholar 

  5. White, E., and Roughan, J., Making disease management patient-centric. Health Manag. Technol. 21:46–54, 2000.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Wright, K., Sparks, L., and O’Hair, D., Health communication in the 21st century. Boston: Blackwell, 2007.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Eichhorst, B., Patient-centric HIS. Health Manag. Technol. 23:40–42, 2002.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Gerteis, M., Edgman-Levitan, S., Daley, J., and Delbanco, T., Through the patient’s eyes: Understanding and promoting patient-centered care. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Gips, M., Challenges posed by patient-centric care. Secur. Manage. 51:16–18, 2007.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Matusitz, J., and Breen, G., Telemedicine: Its effects on health communication. Health Commun. 21:73–83, 2007.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Institute of Medicine, Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century. Washington, D.C.: National Academy, 2001.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Hernandez, A., Reardon, E., Rust, G., Donovan, P., Greene, L., and Moran, M., The medical home: pathway to patient-centric primary care. Wall Township: Healthcare Intelligence Network, 2007.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Street, R., Active patients as powerful communicators: the linguistic foundation of participation in health care. In: Robinson, W. P., (Ed.), Hand of Language and Social Psychology (pp. 541–560). Chichester: Wiley, 2001.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Capella, J., The management of conversational interaction in adults and infants. In: Knapp, M., and Miller, G., (Eds.), Handbook of Interpersonal Communication (pp. 380–418). Thousand Oaks: Sage, 1985.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Lorig, K., Sobel, D., Stewart, A., Brown, B., Bandura, A., Ritter, P., et al., Evidence suggesting that a chronic disease self-management program can improve health status while reducing hospitalization: A randomized trial. Med. Care. 37:15–14, 1999.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Wagner, E., Grothaus, L., Sandhu, N., Galvin, M., McGregor, M., Artz, K., et al., Chronic care clinics for diabetes in primary care: A system-wide randomized trial. Diabetes Care. 24:695–700, 2001.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  17. Johnson, R., Roter, D., Powe, N., and Cooper, L., Patient race/ethnicity and quality of patient-physician communication during medical visits. Am. J. Public Health. 94:2084–2090, 2004.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  18. Breen, G., and Matusitz, J., An interpersonal examination of telemedicine: applying relevant communication theories. eHealth Int. J. 3:18–23, 2007.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Lee, T., Yeh, Y., Liu, C., and Chen, P., Development and evaluation of a patient-oriented education system for diabetes management. Int. J. Med. Inform. 76:655–663, 2007.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  20. Wan, T., Evidence-based health care management: multivariate modeling approaches. New York: Springer, 2002.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Wilson, P., How to find the good and avoid the bad or ugly: A short guide to tools for rating quality of health information on the internet. Br. Med. J. 324:598–602, 2002.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Golin, C., Dimatteo, M., Duan, N., Leake, B., and Gelberg, L., Impoverished diabetic patients whose doctors facilitate their participation in medical decision making are more satisfied with their care. J. Gen. Intern. Med. 17:857–866, 2002.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Gordon, H., Street, R., Sharf, B., Kelly, P., and Souchek, J., Racial differences in trust and lung cancer patients’ perceptions of physician communication. J. Clin. Oncol. 24:904–909, 2006.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  24. Hall, M., Zheng, B., Dugan, E., Camach, F., Kidd, K., Mishra, A., et al., Measuring patients’ trust in their primary care providers. Med. Care Res. Rev. 59:293–318, 2002.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Kirsch, S., and Lewis, F., Using the world wide web in health-related intervention research. Nursing. 22:8–18, 2004.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Feldstein, P., Health care economics. Boston: Thomson Delmar Learning, 2004.

    Google Scholar 

  27. Delbango, R., Filtering internet sites: the issue of censorship on public internet computers in academic and public libraries on long island. New York: Queens College of the City University of New York, 1998.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Beitman, B., and Nair, J., Self-awareness deficits in psychiatric patients: assessment and treatment. New York: Norton, 2005.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Wan, T., Zhang, N., and Unruh, L., Predictors of resident outcome improvement in nursing homes. West. J. Nursing Res. 28:974–993, 2006.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Wan, T., Nursing care quality in nursing homes: Cross-sectional versus longitudinal analysis. J. Med. Syst. 27:283–295, 2003.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Castle, N., and Engberg, J., Nursing home deficiency citations for medication use. J. Appl. Gerontol. 26:208–232, 2007.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  32. Breen, G., and Zhang, N., Introducing ehealth to nursing homes. J. Med. Syst. 32:187–192, 2008.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  33. Sellnow, D., Confident public speaking. New York: Wadsworth, 2004.

    Google Scholar 

  34. Giles, H., Coupland, J., and Coupland, N., Contexts of accommodation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

    Google Scholar 

  35. Short, J., Williams, E., and Christie, B., The social psychology of telecommunications. New York: Wiley, 1976.

    Google Scholar 

  36. Berger, C., and Calabrese, R., Some explorations in initial interaction and beyond. Hum. Commun. Theory. 1:99–112, 1975.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  37. Altman, I., and Taylor, D., Social penetration. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgement

This research is, in part, supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health under research grant number: R01 NR008226–01A1.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Gerald-Mark Breen.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Breen, GM., Wan, T.T.H., Zhang, N.J. et al. Improving Doctor–Patient Communication: Examining Innovative Modalities Vis-à-vis Effective Patient-Centric Care Management Technology. J Med Syst 33, 155–162 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10916-008-9175-3

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10916-008-9175-3

Keywords

  • Clinics
  • Doctors
  • E-health
  • Information technology
  • Health care
  • Hospitals
  • Management
  • Nursing homes
  • Patients
  • Patient-centric care practice
  • Telemedicine