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Journal of Mammalian Evolution

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 147–148 | Cite as

The Incredible Fossils of Urumaco and Beyond: Exploring Venezuela’s Geologic Past

URUMACO AND VENEZUELAN PALEONTOLOGY: THE FOSSIL RECORD OF THE NORTHERN NEOTROPICS. Edited by Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra, Orangel A. Aguilera, and Alfredo A. Carlini. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 2010. 286 pp., $49.95 (cloth). ISBN: 978-0-253-35476-1
  • Alexander K. HastingsEmail author
Book Review
  • 167 Downloads

Not since the publication of Kay et al.’s (1997) volume on the Colombian Miocene La Venta fauna has there been an edited work on the vertebrate paleontology of the northern Neotropics. A similar synthesis of the fossil fauna and its relationship to extant taxa has long been needed for the nearby Miocene-aged Urumaco Formation of Venezuela. This formation has preserved among its layers numerous plants and animals, some of which had never been figured or described in detail until this publication. Aptly edited by esteemed South American paleontologists, this collective work summarizes the state of knowledge of many aspects of the geology and paleobiology of these strata, from plants to armadillos. Before going any further, let me put aside any concerns for non-Spanish speakers; the book is written entirely in English.

Urumaco and Venezuelan Paleontologyis beautifully illustrated throughout by talented paleoartist Jorge González. His illustrations greatly improve the reader’s ability to...

References

  1. Doyle AC (1912) The Lost World. Hodder and Stoughton, LondonGoogle Scholar
  2. Kay RF, Madden RH, Cifelli RL, Flynn JJ (1997) Vertebrate Paleontology in the Neotropics: the Miocene Fauna of La Venta, Colombia. Smithsonian Insitution Press, Washington DCGoogle Scholar
  3. Sánchez-Villagra MR, Aguilera O, Horovitz I (2003) The anatomy of the world’s largest extinct rodent. Science 301:1708–1710PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geological Sciences, Florida Museum of Natural HistoryUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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