Embodiment and Entangled Subjectivity: A Study of Robin Cook’s Coma, Priscille Sibley’s The Promise of Stardust and Alexander Beliaev’s Professor Dowell’s Head

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Abstract

The essay examines Robin Cook’s (1977) Coma and Priscille Sibley’s (2013) The Promise of Stardust that dramatize the reified and disposable status of the brain-dead patients who are classified as nonpersons. The essay argues that the man-machine entanglement as depicted in the novels constructs a deterritorialized and entangled form of subjectivity that intervenes in the dominant biomedical understanding of personhood and agency that we notionally associate with a conscious mind. The essay concludes its arguments by discussing Alexander Beliaev’s (1925) Professor Dowell’s Head which depicts human subjectivity as an essentially embodied and distributive phenomenon and interrogates the Cartesian mind body dualism embedded in the dominant biomedical narratives.

Keywords

Brain-dead Personhood Agency Deterritorialized and entangled subjectivity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and Social SciencesIndian Institute of Technology GuwahatiGuwahatiIndia

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