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Journal of Medical Humanities

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 223–240 | Cite as

Graphic Somatography: Life Writing, Comics, and the Ethics of Care

  • Amelia DeFalco
Article

Abstract

This essay considers the ways in which graphic caregiving memoirs complicate the idealizing tendencies of ethics of care philosophy. The medium’s “capacious” layering of words, images, temporalities, and perspectives produces “productive tensions. . . The words and images entwine, but never synthesize” (Chute 2010, 5). In graphic memoirs about care, this “capaciousness” allows for quick oscillation between the rewards and struggles of care work, representing ambiguous, even ambivalent attitudes toward care. Graphic memoirs effectively represent multiple perspectives without synthesis, part of a structural and thematic ambivalence that provides a provocative counterpart to the abstract idealism of ethics of care philosophy.

Keywords

Caregiving Comics Disability Ethics of care philosophy Illness Life writing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.McMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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