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Implementation of Microcalorimeter Array Technology for Safeguards of Nuclear Material

  • Shannon Kossmann
  • Klara Mateju
  • Katrina Koehler
  • Mark Croce
Article
  • 43 Downloads

Abstract

Safeguards of nuclear materials depend on both destructive and nondestructive assay (DA and NDA, respectively). Ultra-high-resolution microcalorimeter gamma spectroscopy has the potential to substantially reduce the performance gap between NDA and DA methods in determination of plutonium isotopic composition. This paper details the setup of a cryostat and microwave readout system for microcalorimeter gamma spectroscopy, the functionality of which has been successfully demonstrated.

Keywords

Microcalorimeter gamma spectroscopy Superconducting transition-edge sensor Microwave multiplexing 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Materials Protection, Accounting and Control Technologies (MPACT) Campaign.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA
  2. 2.Dartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA
  3. 3.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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