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Journal of Low Temperature Physics

, Volume 176, Issue 5–6, pp 663–669 | Cite as

Superconducting NbN Coplanar Switch Driven by DC Current for CMB Instruments

  • G. BordierEmail author
  • V. D. Cammilleri
  • B. Bélier
  • N. Bleurvacq
  • A. Ghribi
  • M. Piat
  • A. Tartari
  • M. Zannoni
Article

Abstract

The next generations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) instruments will be dedicated to the detection and characterisation of CMB B-modes. To measure this tiny signal, instruments need to control and minimise systematics. Signal modulation is one way to achieve such a control. New generation of focal planes will include the entire detection chain on chip. In this context, we present a superconducting coplanar switch driven by DC current. It consists of a superconducting micro-bridge which commutes between its on (superconducting) and off (normal metal) states, depending on the amplitude of the current injection. To be effective, we have to use a high normal state resistivity superconducting material with a gap frequency higher than the frequencies of operation (millimeter waves). Several measurements were made at low temperature on NbN and yielded very high resistivities. Preliminary results of components dc behavior is shown. Thanks to its low power consumption, fast modulation and low weight, this component is a perfect candidate for future CMB space missions.

Keywords

Microwave circuits RF switch Transmission lines Superconducting material characterisations Cryogenic measurements 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by CNES, CNRS, Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR), Paris Diderot and Paris-Sud universities under the BSD (B-mode Superconducting Detectors) and COSMOS (COmposantS millimétriques Main gauche pour la détection des Ondes gravitationnelles primordiales) French R&D projects.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bordier
    • 1
    Email author
  • V. D. Cammilleri
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Bélier
    • 2
  • N. Bleurvacq
    • 1
  • A. Ghribi
    • 1
  • M. Piat
    • 1
  • A. Tartari
    • 1
  • M. Zannoni
    • 3
  1. 1.Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC)Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Obs de Paris, Sorbonne Paris CitéParis Cedex 13France
  2. 2.Institut d’Electronique FondamentaleUniversité Paris SudOrsay CedexFrance
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Fisica G. OcchialiniUniversità di Milano BicoccaMilanItaly

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