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Behavioral Responses of the Potato Psyllid (Hemiptera: Triozidae) to Volatiles from Dimethyl Disulfide and Plant Essential Oils

Abstract

The behavioral responses of the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) to dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and to 12 plant essential oils were examined in a glass Y-tube olfactometer. DMDS at doses of 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 g showed a significant repellent effect on the psyllids. Cedar wood, lime, savory, thyme and tea tree oils significantly repelled adults over a wide range of doses tested (1, 10, 100, 500, 1,000 and 2,000 μl). The oils of clove and peppermint also had a significant repellent effect on adults at all doses except at the lowest dose (1 μl). The residual effect of 1 g of DMDS persisted for 10 consecutive days whereas five oils (thyme, tea tree, peppermint, savory and clove) remained repellent for the 20-day longevity residual trial.

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Acknowledgments

We thank Greg Kund, Beatriz Gonzalez, Bill Carson, Steve McElfresh, Deborah De La Riva, Kristen Hladun, Christina Mogren, Nichole Drew, Sammuel Gilbert, Khoa Tran (Chris), Kristine Gilbert and Lindsay Johnson for helping in different aspects of this study. Agenor Mafra-Neto and Lyndsie Stoltman (ISCA Technologies, Riverside, CA). This research was partially funded by a USDA SCRI grant (2009-34381-20036), a USDA RAMP grant (2009-51101-05892) and the California Potato Board. Mention of trade names or commercial products in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the University of California-Riverside.

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Correspondence to John Diaz-Montano.

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Diaz-Montano, J., Trumble, J.T. Behavioral Responses of the Potato Psyllid (Hemiptera: Triozidae) to Volatiles from Dimethyl Disulfide and Plant Essential Oils. J Insect Behav 26, 336–351 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10905-012-9350-8

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Keywords

  • Bactericera Cockerelli
  • behavior
  • olfactometer
  • repellents