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Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 270–273 | Cite as

Glycemic Control in US Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Black Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

  • M. Rebecca O’Connor
  • A. Dobra
  • J. Voss
  • C. Pihoker
  • A. Doorenbos
Brief Communication

Abstract

Differences in glycemic control based on race have been reported in pediatric populations with type 1 diabetes (T1D). It is unknown if differences exist between pediatric populations within the same race classification. This retrospective study identified all immigrant and nonimmigrant Black youth diagnosed with T1D and treated at Seattle Children’s Hospital from 2001 to 2011. Demographic characteristics and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels at 12, 24, and 36 months post diagnosis were obtained from existing medical records. Immigrant youth had lower mean HbA1c levels at all three time points. The ethnicity effect on mean HbA1c levels approached significance at 36 months. When comparing 12 and 36 months, the time effect was significant; the ethnicity effect approached significance. Clinically important differences may exist in glycemic control between pediatric populations with T1D from the same race classification. Additional work is needed to confirm these findings and determine potential causes.

Keywords

Diabetes Youth Immigrant Glycemic control HbA1c 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Rebecca O’Connor
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Dobra
    • 1
  • J. Voss
    • 1
  • C. Pihoker
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Doorenbos
    • 1
  1. 1.School of NursingUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Division of EndocrinologySeattle Children’s HospitalSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics, School of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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