Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 390–397 | Cite as

Acute Viral Hepatitis in the United States–Mexico Border Region: Data from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) Project, 2000–2009

  • Philip R. Spradling
  • Jian Xing
  • Alba Phippard
  • Maureen Fonseca-Ford
  • Sonia Montiel
  • Norma Luna Guzmán
  • Roberto Vázquez Campuzano
  • Gilberto Vaughan
  • Guo-liang Xia
  • Jan Drobeniuc
  • Saleem Kamili
  • Ricardo Cortés-Alcalá
  • Stephen H. Waterman
  • the BIDS Investigators
Original Paper

Abstract

Little is known about the characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases in the United States (US)–Mexico border region. We analyzed characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases collected from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project from January 2000–December 2009. Over the study period, 1,437 acute hepatitis A, 311 acute hepatitis B, and 362 acute hepatitis C cases were reported from 5 Mexico and 2 US sites. Mexican hepatitis A cases most frequently reported close personal contact with a known case, whereas, US cases most often reported cross-border travel. Injection drug use was common among Mexican and US acute hepatitis B and C cases. Cross-border travel during the incubation period was common among acute viral hepatitis cases in both countries. Assiduous adherence to vaccination and prevention guidelines in the US is needed and strategic implementation of hepatitis vaccination and prevention programs south of the border should be considered.

Keywords

Acute viral hepatitis Border Mexico Surveillance 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (Outside the USA) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip R. Spradling
    • 1
  • Jian Xing
    • 1
  • Alba Phippard
    • 2
  • Maureen Fonseca-Ford
    • 2
  • Sonia Montiel
    • 2
  • Norma Luna Guzmán
    • 3
  • Roberto Vázquez Campuzano
    • 4
  • Gilberto Vaughan
    • 1
  • Guo-liang Xia
    • 1
  • Jan Drobeniuc
    • 1
  • Saleem Kamili
    • 1
  • Ricardo Cortés-Alcalá
    • 3
  • Stephen H. Waterman
    • 2
  • the BIDS Investigators
  1. 1.Division of Viral HepatitisNational Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Global Migration and QuarantineCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.General Directorate of EpidemiologyMexico CityMexico
  4. 4.National Institute for Epidemiologic Diagnosis and ReferenceMexico CityMexico

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