Perceived Parenting Practices as Predictors of Harmonious and Obsessive Passion Among High Schoolers and Adults

Abstract

Passion has been proposed as one of the potential constructs that could contribute to a more fulfilling life as well as to subjective well-being. The importance of the social environment has been underscored in relation to passion; however, less emphasis has been put on the role of perceived parenting practices. The present two-sample investigation posited that the perceived parenting practices of care, autonomy granting, and overprotection experienced in adolescence are predictive of harmonious (HP) and obsessive (OP) passion which are, in turn, differentially related to subjective well-being. A sample of Hungarian high schoolers (N = 474) and a comprehensive sample of Hungarian adults (N = 471) were recruited for this research to test the proposed model and the generalizability of the findings. The measurement models and the regressive paths were invariant across the two samples, showing that care positively predicted HP, while autonomy granting and overprotection positively predicted OP. Subjective well-being was positively related to HP and care, but not the other variables. The present findings highlight that perceived parenting experiences are related to different indicators of functioning among high schoolers and adults.

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Funding

The first author was supported in the preparation of the manuscript by a Horizon Postdoctoral Fellowship from Concordia University and by funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (435–2018-0368). The second author was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the SCOUP Team – Sexuality and Couples – Fonds de recherche du Québec, Société et Culture. The fourth author was supported by the Young Researcher STARS grant from the Conseil Régional Hauts de France. The previous version of this paper was written while the first author was completing his PhD studies at Eötvös Loránd University.

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Tóth-Király, I., Bőthe, B., Gál, É. et al. Perceived Parenting Practices as Predictors of Harmonious and Obsessive Passion Among High Schoolers and Adults. J Happiness Stud (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-021-00355-8

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Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Dualistic model of passion (DMP)
  • Harmonious passion
  • Obsessive passion
  • Perceived parenting practice
  • Self-determination theory (SDT)